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Saint Augustine, Northeast Florida
Going public with archaeology for outreach, assistance to local governments, and service to the citizens and state of Florida. Visit our website at: http://flpublicarchaeology.org/nerc/
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El Tió de Nadal is Com'in to Town!

 
 
Watch out Santa Clause, El Tió de Nadal is giving you some competition!  Sure, Santa Clause is a great Christmas tradition, a magical way for children to receive presents.  But El Tió de Nadal delivers presents as well - and produces them himself!  So, children now have a choice.....

Which experience would you rather have?

SANTA - (photo: turner.com)
    OR.... 
EL TIO DE NADAL - (Photo: parabebes.com)     

El Tió de Nadal (or roughly translated as "Christmas log") is a character in Catalan mythology and a widespread Christmas tradition in Spanish and Menorcan homes.  He is also affectionately known as Caga Tió (or "poop log") for reasons that will soon become apparent.... (cliff hanger).....
 
(photo: bing.com)


Tió de Nadal (menorca-live.com)


Originally, Tió de Nadal was a simple hollow log, a dead piece of wood, 30 cm long.  This is a Christmas decoration that even the poorest of Menorcan homes could afford!  In more recent years, Tió has come to stand on two or four stick legs with a broadly smiling face painted on the higher end and sporting a red hat (representing the traditional Catalan barretina).  He also now can appear in a variety of sizes.

(photo: slate.com)
 The fun all starts on the Day of the Immaculate Conception, December 8.  Families bring out the happy log and children are tasked with "feeding" it every night until Christmas Eve.  They offer him nuts, dried fruit, and water.  Tió de Nadal must also be covered with a blanket to ensure that he is warm and comfortable.

Feeding -   (photo: awesomoff.com)
But El Tió de Nadal's days of comfort end on December 24th when he is beaten with sticks!

Beating -   (photo: welcome-to-barcelona.com)
  As the log is beaten with sticks, he is ordered to defecate while classical songs of Tió de Nadal are sung.

Beating and Singing -   (photo: bing.com)
Upon being fed, ordered, sung to, and then beaten, Tió's backside delivers small gifts and candy (larger presents come from the Three Wise Men).  Everyone is delighted as they reach below Tió's blanket and retrieve their gifts which were magically "deposited" by the log.

Looking and Retrieving (photo: bing.com)

While everyone is enjoying their gifts from El Tió de Nadal, he is then burned for warmth!


El Tió do Nadal is no longer just popular in Spain and Menorca.  He has now made his way to the FPAN Northeast Office! Excitement abounds as we anticipate the arrival of our gifts.....

Office Feeding (photo: by R. Boggs)

Practice Beating for the Big Day (Photo: R. Boggs)
 Text by Robbie Boggs, FPAN Staff


Pottery Sherd Christmas Ornaments

Deck the halls with...pottery sherd ornaments! It's a quick, easy and fun craft good for any age.


1. Make a salt dough.
The basic recipe is one part flour and one part salt, adding enough water to create a dough. I just wanted a small batch so I mixed 1/4 cup flour and 1/4 cup salt and added about 1/2 cup water. I also added some cinnamon and allspice to make the dough a little more brown as well as give it a nice scent.


Mix the dry ingredients and add the water slowly to create the dough.

Knead the dough until smooth and then roll it out, using some extra flour on your counter to prevent sticking. You can used cookie cutters to create some really great shapes. However, for my pottery sherds, I simply patted the dough into irregular shapes.


2. Decorate
You can create a pottery paddle by using a hot glue gun to drawn the design on a wooden spoon (these are also fun for play dough and clay!) Or you can use shells, leaves, fabric, corn cobs and other natural items to create patterns. You can also draw designs using items like tooth picks and chopsticks.

From left-top, clockwise: Little Manatee shell stamped, check-stamped, San Marcos and Swift Creek.
If historic ceramics are more your style, you can paint the ornaments with acrylic paints after baking to resemble your favorite majolica or pearlwares. You can even create a glazed look with a little bit of clear spray paint.

3. Bake
I baked my sherds at 350 degrees for about 60 minutes. You want to bake them until they harden and dry out. They will brown if you leave them in longer (which you might want to recreate sooting or firing patterns!)

4. Hang and enjoy
String them up with some yarn, raffia or whatever else you have laying around. Hang them on Christmas trees, wreaths, Christmas strings, office walls or where ever else you wish!

Words and images by Emily Jane Murray.

Fort Christmas of Christmas, Florida

            Happy December ya’ll! We just wouldn't be in the proper spirit if this week’s post didn't tie into the holiday season. Did you know that there is both a town and fort in Florida named “Christmas”?
 
Now do you believe me? 


Entrance to Fort Christmas 



The town (in what is now southern Orange County) gets its name from the construction of a Second Seminole War-era fort, commenced on December 25th, 1837 with the arrival of some two-thousand soldiers and volunteers. During this time, the expansion of white settlers to south Florida reinvigorated aspirations to remove Seminole Natives. However, the number of local Seminoles was negligible, and the fort functioned mostly as a supply depot for a short time before being totally abandoned by March of 1838.

FPAN staff pose in front of their favorite structure


The original fort is no longer standing, and its precise location is unknown (although historians and archaeologists are confident of the general area). In the 1970s, construction began on a full-size replica fort.  It was completed by 1977, and the park also features a Florida “Cracker-style” home, as well as other archetypal pioneer Florida houses. For more information, you can view the website here.

Florida Cracker House at the Historical Park



 We’re happy to report that this upcoming weekend is Fort Christmas Historical Park’s annual “Cracker Christmas” celebration. FPAN staff will be present, and this event features many pioneer-era activities such as weaving, blacksmithing, broom making, and much more. Of course, Santa will make an appearance as well! 

Txt by Ryan Harke, FPAN staff. Full credit to Fort Christmas Historical Society and Orange County Parks and Recreation Department for the images used here.  

Heroes of Heritage: Florida National Guard

St. Johns County Commissioners Thank Operation Restore Respect and present FAC's Stewards of Heritage Award.


This week the St. Johns County Board of Commissioners formally thanked the Florida National Guard and Operation Restore Respect volunteers for their year of service in cleaning up San Sebastian Cemetery.  FPAN staff was on hand to add our congratulations and bestow one of our highest honors, Florida Archaeological Council's (FAC) Stewards of Heritage Award.  The bi-annual award is presented to individuals and organizations who have made significant contributions to aid archaeological preservation, further research, educate or otherwise promote public awareness of Florida archaeology.  The organization must also not have preservation in the mission, meaning this is a group that goes beyond the mission of their organization to care for cultural resources.  Florida National Guard traces its military heritage back to the founding of St. Augustine in 1565.  Since then, militia men and women have served to defend local communities.

Home Depot volunteers during 4H cleanup organized by Isaac Turner.

It didn't surprise me last year when I heard the National Guard were going to place flags at the grave sites at San Sebastian Cemetery in West Augustine.  It also didn't surprise me that they were appalled by the condition of the veterans graves.  Despite decade-old efforts to clean up the cemetery, it remained in a state of abandonment with little to no control over Florida foliage or care for the headstones.  I can't even say I was surprised when I heard they were going back after Veterans Day to stage a clean up.  We had been out recently to supervise a local 4H chapter that wanted to get involved with a weekend clean up day.   A lot of concerned groups were coming, yet very few stayed.


Wyatt working with D2 to clean and conserve Veteran headstones.
What surprised me was that after their initial clean up day, they came back.  And they didn't just care for the Veterans, they came back knowing that to truly honor the vets buried there they would need to restore honor to all those buried in San Sebastian.  As they battled the Florida foliage, they also took it upon themselves to seek training in managing cemetery landscapes and caring for historical burial sites.  They took advantage of every training opportunity available to them, and in fact hosted one of our Cemetery Resource Protection Training (CRPT) day long workshops. 



Operation Restore Respect: CMSgt Steven James, Lt Col Teresa Frank, Mark Frank.
On Tuesday we thanked CMSgt Steve James and Lieutenant Colonel Teresa Frank of the Florida National Guard and Mark Frank, founding members of Operation Restore Respect. They along with other volunteers from the Florida National Guard and National Guard Foundation have worked very hard to clear the 3 acre site.  I wanted the audience to know the larger problem of abandoned cemeteries across the state.  The figure is unknowable but could be in the thousands for cemeteries that are in need of stewards like the Franks.  I wanted to thank the county for it's continued interest in historical resources--not just historic cemeteries--and thank them for future services rendered in care of San Sebastian and other sites.  I also wanted to recognize  the Adjutant General of the Florida National Guard, Major General Emmett Titshaw, Jr and Mrs. Tittshaw.  I happened to meet the couple the week before planting flags at the cemetery for Veterans Day.

Major General and Mrs. Tittshaw placing flags the weekend before Veterans Day.

So Mission Accomplished!!!!

Well, not quite.  The foliage is a never ending concern as frequent visits are required to keep the weeds in check.  There are also a few areas of the cemetery yet to be cleared and explored.  Speaking of exploration, they cemetery is in desperate need of a survey and mapping.  The group also depends on the county's continued cooperation for picking up piles of vegetation that have been cleared and backed up into a driveway.

Want to get involved?  Best way is to join Operation Restore Respect Facebook group page where clean ups are coordinated.  You can also call your local FPAN office to ask about adopting an abandoned cemetery near you.  If you join FPAN's CRPT Alliance Facebook page we try and post current events and issues affecting all Florida cemeteries.  And of course you can always attend a CRPT workshop (next one up is in Orlando December 5, 2014).

Operation Restore Respect consider new flowers and evidence of the community returning to pay honor to loved ones the ultimate sign of Mission Accomplished.  Well, part 1 anyway:)

Also check out Department of Military Affairs article posted earlier this week.

Text and Images: Sarah Miller, FPAN staff

Take a Walk on FPAN


Take this opportunity to walk all over FPAN! Or all over our inscribed brick paver that is, located at the Southeastern corner of the Visitor Information Center in St. Augustine, FL.


Our inscribed brick joins many others wanting to leave their mark during the historic city's 450th anniversary. 

They help to compose the red brick patio surrounding the Coquina Ball.  This unique ball marked the eastern end of the Old Spanish Trail, the first transcontinental road from St. Augustine to San Diego, CA.  The marker was placed in 1928, soon after the road's completion.

The profits from the sale of the bricks help to pay for historic preservation projects in St. Augustine.  More information can be found at the Colonial St. Augustine Foundation website.

Text and Images by Robbie Boggs, FPAN Staff

A Site is Born

"How Do You Know Where To Dig?"

Mmmm, stratigraphy (http://proteus.brown.edu/greekpast/4782)


This is one of the questions that we frequently get asked when interacting with the public. Given the wide expanses of Florida's wilds it's no wonder that the public thinks there is more than touch of luck at play concerning the discovery of an archaeological site. To be fair, luck does play a  role in the discovery of many sites. Sites discovered during construction projects, artifacts discovered on a beach after a storm, and evidence of past human occupation eroding from the sides of a river bank are all examples of serendipity at play in discovering archaeological information. But we are scientists and don't deal in the currency of luck for our day to day work; we take what luck gives us and learn from it. While sites can be discovered by happenstance, more often it is through a careful examination of the landscape coupled with research covering past populations in a given area.

Archaeologists often know where to look for an archaeological site based on their knowledge of how sites are formed. This isn't rocket science. Humans, all humans, need food, water, and shelter. Find spots on the landscape that provide the intersection of those three necessities and the chances are quite good that past peoples used that area at some point. Of course this doesn't hold for all archaeological sites: Humans are weird and have a habit of exploring and trying to live in seemingly inhospitable environments. Deserts, mountain tops, outer space, even NYC, are all places that humans have somehow found a way to survive in. For the most part, however, the model of looking for good intersections of food, water, and shelter seem to work for most humans at most times.

Example of inhospitable environments that human survive in (http://www.pinterest.com/pin/69313281735341663/).


Recently we took some of our Timucuan Tehnology curriculum to the Oxbow Eco Center to talk about archaeological site formation with a group of young students. By understanding how a site is formed the students learned how archaeologists work backward through time in their excavations of a site. Students got a chance to actually make a "site" using "artifacts." Students first learned about the Law of Superpostion and why intact stratigraphy is so important for archaeologists. The students were broken up into two groups. The first group had a certain set of "artifacts" to choose from that would represent a Florida site from the Paleo Period to roughly the Early Archaic. These were represented by some charcoal for firepits, animal bones, stone for tools and some shell. The next group of students came to the site and furnished it with stratigraphic layers representing the Middle Archaic to about the time of Contact. These layers incorporated the previous types of artifacts, but also included much more shell, bits of pottery, and glass beads and metal goods closer to the top. After we were done we had all students come out and investigate the site and make inferences about cultures represented in the stratigraphic layers: What was changing? What had stayed the same? What can we say about these past peoples just by looking at how this site was formed?





The group walked away with a better understanding of how archaeologists work and why site preservation is so important. Cultural resource preservation is contingent on environmental resource preservation and we couldn't have asked for a better host to get that point across than the Oxbow Eco Center.

Text by Kevin Gidusko
Pics, except where url given, by Kevin Gidusko

Archaeology Halloween Costumes

It's Halloween time and I know the hot costume this year will be archaeologist! But instead of leather fedoras and bull whips, let's take a look at the most important archaeological accessories you should be sporting!

Your average archaeologist on a day in the field!
1. Hat
 There's nothing more important than keeping cool and looking cool. A hat is a must, especially for Florida archaeologists. The options are endless: a simple baseball cap, a bold straw hat, a sensible bucket hat or even a classic pith helmet!

Great hat: keeps the sun off your face and out of your eyes.
2. Boots
Proper foot attire can make or break a day in the field. Sometimes you need some steel toes, sometimes some with light treads and sometimes some with excellent ankle support. Either way, strap 'em on and get ready for a great Halloween!

Brown is always a very fashionable boot color choice.
3. Digging tool
You can't excavate without the proper implement! Are you going for some light phase one surveying? Grab a shovel! Although it might be a little easier to haul around a pointed trowel for your evening festivities.

Dr. Kathleen Deagen's trowel, as featured in Archaeology Magazine.

4. Notebook or Clipboard
The most important tools for any archaeologist are a pencil and some paper. Does your important field supervisor look require a clipboard? Or maybe just an introspective site surveyor with a small notepad? You can use it to take notes for future costume ideas.

Folding clipboards allow you to stash a pencil as well as other important documents.
5. Glass
Archaeologists need to hydrate morning, noon and night: coffee, water and beer! Cheers!

Mugs - the all purpose drinking vessel, especially when archaeologically themed!
Happy Halloween from FPAN!!
Some of our costumes from last year - Abo Polychrome, St. Johns Check-Stamped, a site and a skeleton!

International Archaeology Day Pub Crawl

Happy Friday to all of our FPAN blog followers and social media fan-kids! Today's post will be brief, so I hope you have time to take it all in. Last evening, FPAN Northeast celebrated the AIA's International Archaeology Day  (October 23) with its 2nd annual downtown St. Augustine PUB (Sarah Miller insisted we not call it "bar") crawl.

AIA created the day for archaeologists and historians around the world to promote their events, and communicate why archaeology is interesting and important. Although the day falls on October 23, the month of October is considered to be international archaeology month, with events spanning all 31 days.

This event was inspired by the City Archaeologist, Carl Halbirt, saying, "You can tell the archaeology and history of St. Augustine by which pub you're sitting at." We at FPAN are not folks to disagree with that sort of comment, so last year we designed a 2-hour, 4-pub tour that spoke about a relevant archaeological site to the pub in question. Unsurprisingly, the event was a major success, and we were eager for round two. Both years we traveled to 4 different pubs, and thus, 4 different archaeological or historic sites.

Rendezvouz was the second stop, right across from a city archaeology dig! 



SAAA club members were out in full force and full dress! 

Group photo in front of the site of Flagler College's previous archaeology field school! 

FPAN Interns and Search Archaeologists enjoying some archaeology lectures

Group photo on Aviles, the oldest street in the country, which we know because of archaeology!!




If all of this sounds like fun to you, please watch our FB page when next October is approaching, or contact Emily Jane (pub director) at EMurray@Flagler. edu and you can come join in on the fun!  We hope to see you next year!! 

Txt and Images, Ryan Harke, FPAN Staff. Quotations and photos belong to Carl Halbirt and FPAN Northeast. 




More Majolica Manicures: Isabela Polychrome



When the Florida Anthropological Society came into town for the annual conference in 2013 I knew I had to do something special.  Inspired by Isabela Polychrome, I set out to do a blue, white, and purple manicure with bands and geometric designs. 

You may remember my previous post on majolica Morisco wares:


Isabela is one of my absolutely favorite types.  I love it so much, I made a manicure inspired by the color and design elements.  Isabela has the same base paste as Columbia and features the twin blue bands on rim and base like Yayal, but the addition of purple glaze is a dead giveaway.  It's the only polychrome Morisco ware and the only historic majolica to feature the color purple.  The designs can be floral, abstract, and geometric.  I sometimes confuse it with Yayal or Santo Domingo when I don't recognize the blackish schmear on the rim is not tar, but actually think purple glaze.  But generally it's easy to pick out.
Another reason to love Isabela?  Vessels often feature Alafias, common Arabic sayings, on the rims.  According to the FLMNH page the Alafias commonly translate to mercy, pardon, pity, or well-being.   A great cultural connection to 16th century Muslim traditions and changes in Spain from a single sherd.
- See more at: http://fpangoingpublic.blogspot.com/2014/07/ceramics-101-majolica-morisco-tradition.html#sthash.f55YLxBR.dpuf

Isabela is one of my absolutely favorite types.  I love it so much, I made a manicure inspired by the color and design elements.  Isabela has the same base paste as Columbia and features the twin blue bands on rim and base like Yayal, but the addition of purple glaze is a dead giveaway.  It's the only polychrome Morisco ware and the only historic majolica to feature the color purple.  The designs can be floral, abstract, and geometric.  I sometimes confuse it with Yayal or Santo Domingo when I don't recognize the blackish schmear on the rim is not tar, but actually think purple glaze.  But generally it's easy to pick out.

Another reason to love Isabela?  Vessels often feature Alafias, common Arabic sayings, on the rims.  According to the FLMNH page the Alafias commonly translate to mercy, pardon, pity, or well-being.   A great cultural connection to 16th century Muslim traditions and changes in Spain from a single sherd.

As per usual I began by looking at the Florida Museum of Natural History's digital type collection to view all examples on Isabela Polychrome.  I also pulled up photos from Kathy Deagan's class of sherds we looked at in class.  From there I applied a thin white base coat to mimic the Colombia Plain glaze and background over what would be a thick, white, coarse earthenware paste.   


https://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/histarch/gallery_types/type_index_display.asp?type_name=ISABELA%20POLYCHROME   

Examples from FLMNH Digital Type Collection (left), examples from class (right).

From there I tried my best to match the cobalt blue and deep purple.  Sometimes in the field I mistake Isabela because the purple looks more like a black schmear of something that shouldn't be there.  But on other examples that beautiful manganese derived purple comes through.  Isabela is the only colonial Spanish sherd that has purple featured on the handpainted decoration.  Later French and British sherds have manganese sponging or much later transfer printed purple designs.   I was surprised to find so many geometric examples, and of course the Arabic Alafia's had to be incorporated.  Here was the result:



The photo at the top of the page was taken during a reception at the Fountain of Youth Archaeological Park where they had Queen Isabel's portrait.  Quite appropriate as they have found Isabela during the digs of Menendez's 1565 landing site out at the Fountain of Youth.  It also popped up last week in Carl's dig at the St. Augustine Art Association (check out the news coverage!). 


For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:
*Initial Feb 2013 posting Majolica Manies
For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:

*Initial Feb 2013 posting Majolica Manies - See more at: http://fpangoingpublic.blogspot.com/2014/07/more-majolica-manicures-aucilla.html#sthash.4yKbqcsx.dpuf
For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:

*Initial Feb 2013 posting Majolica Manies - See more at: http://fpangoingpublic.blogspot.com/2014/07/more-majolica-manicures-aucilla.html#sthash.4yKbqcsx.dpuf
For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:

*Initial Feb 2013 posting Majolica Manies - See more at: http://fpangoingpublic.blogspot.com/2014/07/more-majolica-manicures-aucilla.html#sthash.4yKbqcsx.dpuf

Text and Photos: Sarah Miller, FPAN staff. - See more at: http://fpangoingpublic.blogspot.com/2014/09/majolica-manicures-pensacola-striped.html#sthash.4Guz8DeO.dpuf


Carl in his natural environment, Isabela found in the wild!
 

For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:
*Initial Feb 2013 posting MajolicaManies.

Text and Photos: Sarah Miller, FPAN staff.

References cited: Isabela Polychrome, Historical Archaeology Digital Type Collection, Florida Museum of Natural History.

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