Thursday, July 17, 2014

Ceramics 101: Majolica- Morisco Tradition

Day 4: Majolica! Part 1 of 10* (kidding, not kidding)

Mother load of majolica (Bense 2003).
So exciting you guys, this was the reason I started the #ceramics101 blog.  Moving to Florida from Kentucky I was curious, intimidated, and awestruck by the alien specimens.  To gain familiarity I leaned back on an old grad school trick: flashcards.  I made up at least 100 of these (and by I, I mean intern Matt Armstrong) and began to flip through them day and night.  Cards are good, but looking at real sherds with Kathy Deagan was a dream come true.






TO THE SHERDS!!!!

Monday, July 7, 2014

More Majolica Manicures: Aucilla Polychrome & How To (Steps 1-13)

Earlier this year we put together our first PechaKucha for Florida Archaeology Month.  Ryan talked about what to wear (or not) in the field, Kevin gave an ode to his trowel, and Emily Jane looked at archaeologists obsession with beer.  My contribution was 20 slides/20 seconds each talking about the whats and whys of Majolica Manicures.  

Monday, June 30, 2014

2014 Field School Notes

By now, most of our local field schools have wrapped it up for the summer. I got the chance to visit UNF's excavation at the Grand Shell Ring and UF's excavation at Bulow Plantation. Here's some notes from each!

Grand Shell Ring
This shell ring, on Big Talbot Island in Jacksonville, is the only non-Archaic shell ring on the East Coast! Wo-ow!! It dates to the Mississipian Period, between AD 900-1200. It is about 60x75 meters and about 1 meter high. The shell ring is made of lots of shell, animal remains and a few scattered artifacts like pottery. There's also an adjacent sandy burial mound at the site.

Sorting through lots of shell and faunal remains!

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

More Majolica Manicures: San Elizario for SAA

Since the first Majolica Manies post back in February 2013, I've added quite a bit to my repertoire.  And some for very good reasons.  Over the next few weeks I'll be loading up at least 7 more #MajolicaMani, so keep checking back.  And we love FAN NAIL: do your own archaeology inspired manicures and send them to me at @fpannortheast or @semiller88 on Twitter.

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Florida Historic Cemeteries and Shells!!

The Shells of Historic Cemeteries in Florida

In the coming months, I’m beginning a “shell project” at San Sebastian Cemetery in St. Augustine. Back in November, Sarah and I visited the cemetery to evaluate local upkeep and management efforts. The story begins with Sarah pointing out a really large conch shell lain at the base of a headstone near the cemetery entrance. My first reaction was that of surprise; it was a helmet conch (Cassis madagascarensis), which does not typically range north of the Florida Keys because of temperature thresholds. Thus, my first thought was wondering how it found its way to a northeast Florida cemetery.

The Helmet Conch that started it all...



Long story short, we’ve decided to investigate potential shell exchange networks from south Florida and the Caribbean, into the northern reaches of Florida. This topic is researched heavily throughout the prehistory of Florida, as circum-Florida-Gulf/Atlantic shells have ended up in chiefly burial mounds in Tennessee, Oklahoma, Illinois, and more; it’s probably time someone examined how their pathways into historic cemeteries.

Shell "gorget" or pendant found in a prehistoric burial in Oklahoma



When we think of shells at historic cemeteries, we often think of the ethnic groups that may have placed them there. For example, African-Americans, Caribbean, and Hispanic populations probably come to mind, but we know that historic Native American groups (especially in the panhandle), and Euro-American populations have decorated graves with shells.



Queen conch resting on top of a headstone

So, what do shells mean? Like anything else, it’s complicated, and the short answer is that we’re not always sure. Something as personal as a family/friend grave adornment is certainly difficult to pin down. Nonetheless, some overarching explanations have been offered:

-Shells enclose the soul’s immortal presence
-Shells mark a spiritual pilgrimage of some kind
-For African-Americans, they represent the sea—the trip across the Atlantic from Africa
-Sometimes they can be a simple offering or decoration like other grave goods
-Shells can be “killed” or punctated, so they too can be taken into the afterlife with the deceased


Shells in a line on a cemetery ledger in Pensacola



**What will we be asking? 

-What species of shells are common to Florida historic cemeteries?
-Where are the shells coming from- Can they be found locally?
                Florida? Caribbean?
-Are they being purchased? Collected? Traded?



Kevin and EmJ pose in front of a creative and shell-laden headstone


We’ll begin to address these questions at the San Sebastian Cemetery in St. Augustine. Myself, Sarah, and Mark Frank will be conducting gridded, systematic surveys of shell types and densities at the cemetery, with hopes to expand to others throughout the region.

Sarah, Mark Frank and volunteers pose after a  cemetery cleaning day


As with all FPAN endeavors, we plan to involve the public as part of a citizen science initiative.

Finally, what’s learned from this project can be incorporated into our CRPT trainings. 


Text and Images, Ryan Harke, FPAN Staff. Shell gorget used with permission from Nancy White. 

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

CRPT Conference Bonanza!

This past week (June 3-4) FPAN West-Central and FPAN Northeast co-hosted the first-ever CRPT conference in the Thomas Center at the University of Florida, Gainesville. The 2-day program was broken into field and presentation components, respectively. Despite being the inaugural--and experimental--CRPT conference, the sessions ran smoothly, and the meetings were a huge success.


Day 1
The morning session of the first day took place at Evergreen Cemetery, and included numerous demonstrations:

Kevin Gidusko, FPAN-EC staff demonstrates how GPR works




Sarah talks about maintaining historic ironworks
Sarah instructs the group while Ryan and Emily Jane (FPAN-NE) reset a headstone
 
Ryan (FPAN-NE) and Becky (FPAN-WC) show how to clean headstones

..And was followed in the afternoon with some noted cemetery speakers:



Day 2 
Sarah had groups practice some cemetery conflict management




Mary Homick, photographer, speaks about the aesthetic value of cemeteries

As a city planner, Adrienne Burke talks about managing municipal cemeteries and developing long-term plans


At dinner, Sharyn Thompson talks about her many year's work in FL Historic Cemeteries 

Of course, this isn't everything, but a just a snippet of what went on at the conference. We hope to see you next year! Later on this year, pay attention to the FPAN website, especially the Northeast and West-Central calendars for details about next year's event!

Friday, June 6, 2014

Cemetery a Day in May: Pablo Cemetery (Duval County)

Cemetery log date: May 17, 2014

Hello there #CaDiMers! You're looking lovely today. I'm really excited to tell you about Pablo Cemetery, near Mayport, FL, as it was the site of our most recent CRPT training. It has also been known as the Mayport Cemetery, and  originally as the Dewees Family Cemetery. Recently, both research and preservation have become hot topics at Pablo. As a local and descendant, Janet (last name) began the "Andrew Dewees project", making lots of new discoveries regarding the cemetery's complex history. She has spent years pouring over genealogical records and historic maps to uncover the true nature and extent of the Pablo Cemetery.

 Like many historic cemeteries in Florida and elsewhere, the modern fences are probably not an accurate representation of the cemetery limits (i.e. it's not unlikely that there are burials in other areas extending beyond the road, fence, etc.). Recently, Dr. Gordon Rakita of the University of North Florida (UNF) has joined the project to assist with defining the site boundaries and potentially locating unmarked burials and submerged monuments with a GPR unit. He also was present at the CRPT training and performed a GPR demonstration in the field.

CRPT Participants pose for a group shot at Pablo Cemetery 




WHO: 
Founding members of the Mayport region, notably including the Dewees family and relatives, Yellow fever victims, and others.



Participants try their hand at GPR data collection


WHAT:
Pablo is a privately-owned community cemetery just outside Mayport, FL. There is a "Mayport Cemetery Association" that maintains the cemetery.
Before 





After D2 cleaning 


WHEN: 
The earliest known burial dates to 1881, although it's not unlikely that there could be older unmarked graves. It's also possible that nearby tributaries of the St. John's River could have swallowed an early section of the cemetery, as historic maps indicate they once flowed much closer to the modern site boundaries.



WHERE:
Pablo is located at the south end of Sand Castle lane, south of Wonderwood Drive. The address is technically Jacksonville, though the cemetery lies near the Mayport city limit.


WHY:

-Andrew Dewees and family are buried there, pioneering settlers of the northeast Florida area around Mayport

-Lily Thomas--a lady who lived to be 108--was a Singleton of the local fishing company in town

-The cemetery has an interesting and complex history. It's known that yellow fever victims were buried there, once identified by wooden markers that have since decayed.

-An expert witness noticed stone markers being purposely buried to make room for new markers. Locating these stones is a major component of Dr. Rakita's GPR work

-A phase I archaeological survey of the area identified prehistoric toolmaking debris and a soil signature indicating a mound may once have stood on the property.







Text and Images by Ryan Harke,  FPAN staff, full credit to Janet for historical background information. 

To locate more Northeast Florida Cemetery posts, search "Cemetery a Day in May" or #CaDiM





2014 #CaDiM posts


2013 #CaDiM posts
IntroMay 1: NationalMay 2: OakdaleMay 3: Murphy's CreekMay 4: Mt. OliveMay 5: Bosque BelloMay 6: Old CityMay 7: EspanolaMay 8: TolomatoMay 9: PacettiMay 10: West ViewMay 11: Magnolia Springs,  May 12: St. Peter'sMay 13: Gravely HillMay 14: Pilgrim's RestMay 15: God's Little AcreMay 16: Dummet's GraveMay 17: No NameMay 18: St. MonicaMay 19: St. Joseph'sMay 20:  Old St. Joseph's (Duval)May 21: SampsonMay 22: Fernandez ReserveMay 23: St. AmbroseMay 24: Sons of IsraelMay 25: SanksvilleMay 26: HuguenotMay 27: Nombre de DiosMay 28: BeresfordMay 29: JonesMay 30: San Sebastian/PinehurstMay 31: Oaklynn

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Cemetery a Day in May: Welaka-Georgetown and the FMSF

Cemetery Log Date: May 22, 2014

Last year's CaDiM left us pondering how to protect cemeteries by visiting them; this year, we wanted to draw your attention to the Florida Master Site File (FMSF).

Toni gathering some information for the FMSF form for Welaka-Georgetown.
The FMSF is an inventory of all know cultural resources in the state of Florida, on private and public lands alike. Archaeological sites, historic structures and historic cemeteries are all included. Each site is given a specific identifying number and information like exact location, type of site, history of the site and other research is included.

Why is it important to get onto the list? The list is meant to help with long-term planning of construction, conservation or other similar projects. For instance, if a new highway is to be built, planners could start with looking at the project area and determine to place the road out of the way of important cultural resources from day one. Once a big project like this has started, if builders stumble upon a resource, it's harder to change plans to not impact the site.

While many local cemetery inventory projects have happened by historical and genealogical societies, this information does not always make it into the FMSF. With some of our ongoing programming about cemeteries, we've tried to raise awareness and get people working on adding cemeteries to the FMSF.

These cemeteries from our blog this year are not currently listed: Hilliard Community, Kingsley slave era cemetery, Norwalk, Garden of Heavenly Rest, Albritton, Welaka-Georgetown

The Welaka-Georgetown Cemetery started as the Ridgewood Cemetery in 1917. The cemetery served the small community, from which it received its namesake. It is the final resting place for several members of the Rogers family, associated with Margarie Kinnon Rawlings novels. It is still in use today.

Who: Cemetery association

What: 20th century African-American cemetery still serving the community today

Where: 174 Beecher Springs Road - Take CR 308-B east out of Welaka to Beechers Springs Road.  Turn right & travel .6 miles to cemetery


When: Open daily, from dawn to dusk

Why:
  • Wonderful venacular headstones including poured cement
  • Literary ties through the Rogers family members to Majorie Kinnan Rawlings
  • Peaceful "Old Florida" feel featuring rolling sand dunes, large oaks and pine




Check out a listing of the graves here.

Text and images by Emily Jane Murray and Toni Wallace, FPAN Staff.

2014 #CaDiM posts


2013 #CaDiM posts
IntroMay 1: NationalMay 2: OakdaleMay 3: Murphy's CreekMay 4: Mt. OliveMay 5: Bosque BelloMay 6: Old CityMay 7: EspanolaMay 8: TolomatoMay 9: PacettiMay 10: West ViewMay 11: Magnolia Springs,  May 12: St. Peter'sMay 13: Gravely HillMay 14: Pilgrim's RestMay 15: God's Little AcreMay 16: Dummet's GraveMay 17: No NameMay 18: St. MonicaMay 19: St. Joseph'sMay 20:  Old St. Joseph's (Duval)May 21: SampsonMay 22: Fernandez ReserveMay 23: St. AmbroseMay 24: Sons of IsraelMay 25: SanksvilleMay 26: HuguenotMay 27: Nombre de DiosMay 28: BeresfordMay 29: JonesMay 30: San Sebastian/PinehurstMay 31: Oaklynn

Friday, May 30, 2014

Cemetery a Day in May: Pine Rest Cemetery (Martin County)

Cemetery Log Date: May 30, 2014

Pine Rest Cemetery is located in Port Salerno, FL (which is why it is also known as "Port Salerno Cemetery.).  This fishing town was created as a small settlement in the southern shores of St. Lucie river inlet.  It was named "Salerno" because the main settlers were emigrants from the Italian city of Salerno.







 The first burial was Donald Homes, a child, with several other first settlers following him.  The cemetery is approximately 3 acres and is quite open with just a few old, large pine trees remaining in the old section.  The oldest part of the cemetery consists of stones oriented north/south, the newer section east/west.



WHO: Pine Rest Association
WHAT: Cemetery in Port Salerno, FL
WHEN: Dawn til Dusk
WHERE: Port Salerno -On North side of SE Cove Road at SE 45th Avenue
WHY:
  • Resting place for some of Port Salerno's first residents
  • 227 marked graves with dates ranging from 1916 - 1996
  • Markers are a combination of Marble, Granite, and Cement
Text by: Robbie Boggs
Images by: Findagrave, and rootsweb.ancesrty.com

2014 #CaDiM posts
May 24: Fort Christmas, May 25: St. Luke's Episcopal, May 26: Crabgrass Cemetery, May 27, May 28, May 29: Fort Drum


2013 #CaDiM posts
IntroMay 1: NationalMay 2: OakdaleMay 3: Murphy's CreekMay 4: Mt. OliveMay 5: Bosque BelloMay 6: Old CityMay 7: EspanolaMay 8: TolomatoMay 9: PacettiMay 10: West ViewMay 11: Magnolia Springs,  May 12: St. Peter'sMay 13: Gravely HillMay 14: Pilgrim's RestMay 15: God's Little AcreMay 16: Dummet's GraveMay 17: No NameMay 18: St. MonicaMay 19: St. Joseph'sMay 20:  Old St. Joseph's (Duval)May 21: SampsonMay 22: Fernandez ReserveMay 23: St. AmbroseMay 24: Sons of IsraelMay 25: SanksvilleMay 26: HuguenotMay 27: Nombre de DiosMay 28: BeresfordMay 29: JonesMay 30: San Sebastian/PinehurstMay 31: Oaklynn

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Cemetery a Day in May: Fort Drum Cemetery (Okeechobee County)

Cemetery Log Date: May 29, 2014

Discover one of Florida's ghost town cemeteries at  Fort Drum in Okeechobee County.

(Image by Find a Grave)

 The cemetery covers 8 acres with 381 internments, ranging in dates from 1876 to current day.

Henry Parker (Image by LaMartin.com)

 Fort Drum was a Seminole War fort built in the 1840's and abandoned soon after. The first pioneers moved to the area about 1870.  Henry Parker was one of those pioneers and opened a store and trading post attached to the side of his log cabin home.  The nearby Seminole Indians were some of Parker's regular customers trading alligator, deer and otter hides for guns, ammunition and groceries. Parker, along with many other first pioneers, can be found in the Fort Drum Cemetery. 
  

(Image by Find a Grave)

(Image by Flicker) 

(Image by Jim Pike)

  
WHO: Owned and maintained by Okeechobee County

WHAT: Early pioneer cemetery

WHEN: Dawn til Dusk

WHERE: US 441 and NE 304th Street, Fort Drum, FL map

WHY:
  •  Many of Fort Drums first settlers were buried and remain here
  • Interesting Florida ghost town cemetery
  • Contains graves with dates ranging from 1876 to current day

For more information, look at:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=329774,
http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/fl/fortdrum.html


Text by: Robbie Boggs


2014 #CaDiM posts


2013 #CaDiM posts
IntroMay 1: NationalMay 2: OakdaleMay 3: Murphy's CreekMay 4: Mt. OliveMay 5: Bosque BelloMay 6: Old CityMay 7: EspanolaMay 8: TolomatoMay 9: PacettiMay 10: West ViewMay 11: Magnolia Springs,  May 12: St. Peter'sMay 13: Gravely HillMay 14: Pilgrim's RestMay 15: God's Little AcreMay 16: Dummet's GraveMay 17: No NameMay 18: St. MonicaMay 19: St. Joseph'sMay 20:  Old St. Joseph's (Duval)May 21: SampsonMay 22: Fernandez ReserveMay 23: St. AmbroseMay 24: Sons of IsraelMay 25: SanksvilleMay 26: HuguenotMay 27: Nombre de DiosMay 28: BeresfordMay 29: JonesMay 30: San Sebastian/PinehurstMay 31: Oaklynn