Friday, September 12, 2014



I was asked to give a talk in Pensacola to the Florida Anthropological Society's local chapter Pensacola Archaeological Society last year.  In preparation for the talk I came across a reference to Pensacola Striped Polychrome, a majolica type found so far only in Pensacola.  In honor our our rival city, seemed the perfect fit for my next #MajolicaMani. 


Majolica Feature.  Photo credit: UWF.
The striped majolica was first discovered in a bean-shaped feature in the warehouse area of the Spanish Presidio Santa Maria de Galve (1698-1719) during the 1998 UWF field school excavation.  The pit was full of a variety of majolica as well as charred peas, beans,and lentils.  The other ceramics were types commonly made in Mexico during the early eighteenth-century.  For more on excavation of site site, including maps, excavation images, and other artifacts and features, check out the UWF Department of Anthropology and Archaeology webpage dedicated to the Fort.  


The manicure itself was relatively easy to do.  The hardest part was matching the blue (mix of three), an ongoing problem I've had with nailing down the majolica color palette.  It's interesting to note which bands are black lined and which ones are not.  From the above right picture, the top sherd lacks the black line boarder on the outer rims, yet on the lower sherd the black fine lines are present.  All the interior bands are black lined.  The white tin-enameled glaze is fairly opaque according to the photo, suggesting it's an earlier Mexico City based majolica and not a later Puebla-based ceramic.  To render this for the manicure I used a more opaque base coat of white.  I did outline all the bands with black to make it cleaner.  From my own hypothesis then, I guess all my nails are center body sherds and no rims present.





For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:
*Initial Feb 2013 posting Majolica Manies
For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:

*Initial Feb 2013 posting Majolica Manies - See more at: http://fpangoingpublic.blogspot.com/2014/07/more-majolica-manicures-aucilla.html#sthash.4yKbqcsx.dpuf
For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:

*Initial Feb 2013 posting Majolica Manies - See more at: http://fpangoingpublic.blogspot.com/2014/07/more-majolica-manicures-aucilla.html#sthash.4yKbqcsx.dpuf
For more #MajolicaMani posts check out:

*Initial Feb 2013 posting Majolica Manies - See more at: http://fpangoingpublic.blogspot.com/2014/07/more-majolica-manicures-aucilla.html#sthash.4yKbqcsx.dpuf

Text and Photos: Sarah Miller, FPAN staff.  Manicure images by Sarah, artifacts photo top right and majolica feature in the field are from Presidio Santa Maria de Galve, UWF Division of Anthropology and Archaeology.

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